Sunday, 16 February 2014

Work Shed Progress


I've been working intermittently on the work shed for the last seven days. Other things have demanded my time so I'm not as far along as I would like to be. This is where I left off -


I built the frame of the floor and covered it with plywood, then glued all of the walls into place



If you're planning to make any structure like this, it pays to make 'spacers'. These spacers sit in between the frame whilst it is gluing to ensure even distribution. I wanted this shed to look weathered but not decrepit. You've probably seen this technique a bunch of times but if not, you take a bottle of white vinegar (I used Sarson's white malt vinegar)


stick it in a jar with a wad of steel wool

and leave it overnight. When you paint the solution onto wood, the reaction causes it to grey like wood that has been rained on for many years.


I experimented with different strengths and found that 1/4 solution to 3/4 cold water made the plywood a nice silvery grey. Stronger solutions made the plywood a darker, dirtier brown colour. I painted one coat on all of the plywood sheet I had with the vinegar solution and when it was dry, I cut it into strips to mimic wood planks. The wood strips are glued overlapping, to give it a more detail.


To make sure it was level, I measured either side of the plank, to the top of the frame.


It needs some trim to pretty up the corners where the planks meet but overall, I like the way it turned out. When everything is glued into place I will add water damage marks/moss with paint and pastels. I think it needs some 'nails' in it too, to make it look more realistic.


The roof trusses are simple 'A' frames. The distance between the trusses are the same as the shed frame


The roof is removable so that I have more room to work on the shed contents


I still have to continue the overlapping slats up into the roof, add windows and their beading, make some strap hinges for the doors before I can get to my favourite part of making the tool bench and accessories for inside =0D. Oh yes, and landscaping a base for the shed...


You can see in the picture above, the plywood I used on the roof turned an icky dark colour. I'm going to use some cheap sandpaper, painted, to mimic the asphalt sheet you see on life-size sheds.


That's it for now.

Have a great weekend

Pepper =0)

54 comments:

  1. It is WONDERFUL!!!! I love the color, such a wonderful aged look. Adding the moss green will make it all the more realistic. I can't wait to see more. :-)

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  2. Awesome! I love old wood sheds! :D

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  3. Beautiful! I like the color.
    Bye, Faby

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  4. The grey is so nice- Thanks for your tip!
    Neomi

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  5. The silver color is beautiful, just the right color for an old shed. I knew about the vinegar, but I have never done it yet. I am curious to see the interior, Pepper :D!
    Ilona

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    1. Thank you IIona. The interior shouldn't be too long =0P

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  6. You really are doing a great job on this shed! The aging process gives it a realistic look. When I look at the structure, I have to wonder as I do with all of the really expert miniaturist. How did you learn to do this? Did you take a class, are you a professional in human sized construction or does it just come naturally? I would love to be this good.

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    1. Thanks Grandmommy. I was always a bit of a tomboy so I took woodworking at school instead of cooking, Metal work instead of childcare. Plus I've spent an awful long time practicing and watching other people. So I guess you just have to get into the thick of it and try. After a while it gets easier...promise =0)

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  7. Hi Pepper! Your shed looks beautiful! I can't wait to see it finished! I love the dark wood effect, it almost looks creosoted! Nice trick with the vinegar, my wife uses the same stuff when she dyes cloth, the problem is the smell, it stays with us for ages. Do you have any tricks for dealing with that?
    Kind regards, Brian.

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    1. Hey Brian,
      this is the first time I've used vinegar on wood and I have to say the smell went shortly after the wood dried. I'm not so sure on cloth...how about something as pungent smelling to soak it in, like lemon?? You'll have to let me know if you find something that works =0)

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    2. That's great, the smell was caring me away from the project, but if it can be gotten rid of I guess that's okay. It does look like creosote, too!

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  8. It was just last night my bf and I were trying to figure out how to achieve the weathered grey wood effect for miniatures!! Thanks for the tip :) The siding is just gorgeous. I'm looking forward to seeing what you do with the sandpaper asphalt next.

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    1. Hi Kristine, you know if I'm looking for a trick I often Google to see how it's done on life-size items. More often than not it works in miniature too =0)

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  9. That looks very promissing Pepper! I like it that you build it like you do, that definately adds (a lot of) realism. It looks very official, very good. I'm looking forward to your progress, I hope you can spend more time on it than the past two years ;)

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    1. Thank you Monique, I'm glad you like it =0)

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  10. Great build! Thanks for showing the construction. I'm wondering....... With the vinegar solution, could there be acid issues where residue might react with and damage precious miniatures housed within? I couldn't find an answer to my concern with this so I opted for the India Ink and methylated spirits alternative but I don't think it has quite the depth of weathered appearance as achieved with the vinegar solution. Looking forward to seeing this shed progress!

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    1. Hi Susan,
      I read the same thing on Miniatures.about.com. I decided to use the solution on the outside of the shed only, just in case. I haven't noticed any problems yet, and I have left the treated wood next to other bare wood, but best not to take any chances. =0)

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  11. Bonjour Pepper,
    Jolis débuts...J'aime les toits amovibles! Pour le papier de verre, attention! Celui-ci ne supporte pas l'humidité. Il vaut mieux utiliser de la "toile Emeri" Les grains de sable ne se détacheront pas et le papier ne gondolera pas....
    Ps: Il existe du vinaigre sans odeur, mais le jus de citron marche tout aussi bien...
    Bonne journée...
    Dominique

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    1. Merci pour le conseil Dominique. Je vais essayer de jus de citron prochaine fois. Ainsi, le papier de verre ne colle pas? Je devrais essayer sur une petite zone d'abord ... ou peut-être utiliser quelque chose d'autre.

      Merci = 0)

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  12. The shed looks great. I look forward to seeing the other aging treatments you use with the moss green etc and to seeing the work bench.

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    1. Thank you, I hope it works out the way I think it will ha-ha =0)

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  13. I love it ! It is going to be a great piece !
    Bravo !

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  14. OMG, you did all of that in a WEEK?! It might not seem like enough progress to you, but getting to this point on a small project would take me at least a month.

    I actually did not know about that wood weathering technique; I'll have to pin that for future reference (I'm thinking of making an old, weathered, detached garage to go with the bungalow).

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    1. Hi Anna,
      I don't know if it's sad and I have no life or if I'm a fast worker ;0)
      I love to see buildings with a bit of age to them. Good luck with your garage =0)

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  15. O' wow! I am totally amazed how you did the whole thing in a week! I Love the aging you did! Thank you for the tutorial!
    Hugs
    Kikka

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    1. Aww, thank you Kikka. That's very kind of you to say =0)

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  16. I had not seen that greying technique before either, what a fantastic result. I will be copying that on a beach hut. I think your work is amazing and await your response to one of the question above, ie. how did you get to be that clever !

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    1. Ha-ha, thank you Elbey. I'm not clever, just lucky I guess =0)

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  17. Very cool! Can't wait to see all the stuff you will make for the inside... :-)

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    1. Hey Jo *waves* You got any snow yet??

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    2. Nope.... Sunshine all the way!!! I do love this country.... :-)

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  18. The shed looks fantastic, and even more amazing that it is built with a frame! love the roof trusses and siding, which is everything really :D. and I didn't know about that wire wool technique, and it is definitely something I now want to utilise, somewhere, so thanks for sharing that, I didn't know about it at all, and it is one of my favourite finishes on wood too :D

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    1. Hi Sarah, thank you and I'm always happy to pass on anything I've picked up along the way. I agree...I love to see weathered buildings in miniature. =0)

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  19. Hello Pepper,
    Your ageing and weathering is fantastic. I have seen the technique before, but you did a really spectacular job of it. The shed is turning into a real master piece.
    Big hug,
    Giac

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  20. I've never heard of the steel wool and vinegar thing...thanks for sharing the tip. I may have to try that one! I can't believe you did this in a week! Beautiful work as usual!

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    1. I also like the idea of painting sand paper for asphault. I usually just use textured stone spray paint.

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    2. Hi M4M, I never thought of using textured paint. Hmm, maybe try that too =0)

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  21. Looks great, Pepper! Thanks for sharing your methods. BTW - my old AJay's modelling blog is no more - the new one is under my nick-name, Art :)

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    1. Hey Art =0)
      Thanks, I found your new blog and I'm following!

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  22. Your skills are amazing, what can't you do? Your shed is looking great and coming along fast! I like the vinegar and steel wool tip, although I won't be building any sheds, it would be great for other little mini projects and some life-sized projects. Can't wait to see the end result!

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    1. Thank you and I look forward to seeing some of your new creations =0)

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  23. Es un trabajo fabuloso, me encanta el granero.
    Un abrazo.
    Yolanda

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    1. Gracias Yolanda. Eso es muy amable de su parte
      =0)

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  24. I love what you're doing! The shed is coming along great and you're so clever. If you decide to put in some "nails", remember that the framing crew doesn't always hit the studs with the nails. A few are certain to poke through to the inside where they have missed. :-)

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  25. Thank you for this great tutorial, I will try it! Hugs, Melli

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