Saturday, 31 May 2014

Make hay while the sun shines

It's been a lovely sunny day today, made sunnier by the fact that I have two weeks off work. Yay! I won't bore you with details of my plans, save to say that I will be spending my housekeeping money at the York Miniature Fair next weekend. =0)

A little progress on the shed. I must come up with a better name than just 'The Shed'. Maybe Jimmy's work shed (that was my Dads name), or something pretty like 'Green fields'. I think a building should have a name. Anyway, it now has a tower bolt to keep the door shut, the beginnings of a workbench and I made something simple to go inside.



Since getting a drill press/milling machine, cutting holes in metal is so much easier. The tower bolt is just brass rod. I drilled a hole, lathed another piece of brass to make the teeny handle and soldered them together. The work bench is spare pieces from the roof frame. I'm thinking the owner of this shed is thrifty. As a rule of thumb, workbench surfaces are around 33" - 35" from the ground. This equates to 69mm - 74mm in 12th scale. I've made mine at 70mm. I cut all of the legs at 68mm height, then added 2mm Boxwood for the top. The surface of the workbench overhangs the legs on one side. This is so it can house a joiners vice...when I finish it.

The idea for the thing I made, came after I had a delivery of white spirit. I liked the look of the 5lt  tins it comes in. I took some 6mm MDF and cut it into a 15mm strip. Then I cut the strip at 25mm intervals. The MDF is a base to wrap aluminium around. I guess you could use anything for this but a hard material allows the aluminium to bend cleanly. I was struggling to find aluminium thin enough to do this in scale until inspiration hit.


Yeah, a Bacofoil cooking tray. The aluminium is thin enough to work on by hand but still keeps it's shape. You glue a piece on the top...




When the glue sets, you wrap aluminium around the sides. One of the edges of aluminium is bent over to give that machine pressed appearance.


The handle is another strip of aluminium and the lid is a slice of 3mm aluminium rod. You could paint it, put a label on there, weather it with some rust...



Next on my list will be some paint tins and old jars. Should be fun =0)

I've just realised,  my third year blog anniversary has passed. About time for a give-away I think. Oh, talking of anniversaries, I hope there are lots of entries in Rosa's Minis Modernas Anniversary Contest.
Give it a go. There's a chance to win 100 euros worth of goodies from Rosa's shop.

Better go...there's a cool glass of rum and cola calling =0P

Have a wonderful weekend

Pepper =0)

55 comments:

  1. The shed is looking so GREAT!!! I love the bench you made. Everything is so perfectly scaled you would never know it was a miniature. The lock that goes into the floor is fabulous.
    I love the cans, very creative/inspired using the aluminum. I look forward to seeing the labels. Lot of those can be found online or in Pinterest.

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    1. Thank you Catherine. I'll have a look see for some labels =0)

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  2. Thanks for the can tutorial :-). The furnishings are beautifully made​​, very fine. And the scale is so perfect...
    Enjoy your holiday Pepper
    Hugs

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    1. Thank you so much Mara Garcia, that is very kind of you X

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  3. Far out!!! I didn't realise this was a miniature until I read the first comment!

    Great job!

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  4. Hello Pepper,
    Sometimes it scares me to see miniature rooms that are so incredibly realistic! This is one of them. Your work is amazing. The items you made are also perfection. You always figure out how to make anything and make it look realistic. You are incredibly talented. Big hug,
    Giac

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    1. Aww thank you Giac, you're very kind. Big hug right back at you X

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  5. I really really thought you were showing something you wanted to make in a small size. I didn't realize it was already made in a small size! So realistic! That can is amazingly real looking and easy to make.

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  6. Amazing work, it looks so realistic.

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  7. Fantastic doesn't really cover it! As for the can, absolutely wonderful.

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  8. Your shed is simply lovely and I love the aluminium tin :)

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  9. Forgot to say enjoy your time off work and enjoy the York show.

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    1. Thank you. You heading out to the York Fair? =0)

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  10. Wow, really love your simple idea to make a tin. Will definitely have a go at this.

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  11. I can't wait to see everything piled up under the workbench, that space is calling for loads of interesting shed stuff! The cans are fantastic. I have to have a go at that! Oh and i love the little bolt too, that attention to detail is so worth it. You've probably already thought of it, but you have to have a jar of rusty nails and a bird nest! Im dying to join in with the decor of the shed :D It's a great space for loads of unusual miniatures. Have a great time at the fair! :D x

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    1. Ha-ha, You ALWAYS have a jar of rusty nails in a shed otherwise you just aren't a real shed owner =0) Please do join in...I would love some Sarah miniatures in there =0D

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  12. Hi Pepper! I echo other peoples comments, your work looks so realistic, it's truly amazing! Your 5-litre can looks spot-on, thanks for the little tutorial, a great idea!
    Kind regards, Brian.

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  13. I'm back, I forgot to say.........Happy Anniversary! :)

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  14. You have done a great job with this, I especially love the bolt and tin, looks very good and real (smart thinking on the tin)! And also congratulations on your 3 year anniversary of course, enjoy the fair next weekend, will be lots of fun, I'm sure, bye!

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  15. Great idea on the tin and I would have never thought of using foil from a baking pan. The shed looks amazing!

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    1. Thanks Cyd. Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention. I didn't have any thin aluminium sheet but I did have baking trays =0D

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  16. I'm really looking forward to seeing what you do with Jinny's workshed. Love the idea of having a sliding bolt.....just another bit of realism!!

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  17. Me encanta la lata. Creo que será un bonito proyecto.

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    1. Gracias Isabel. Espero que pruebes el tutorial

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  18. Espectacular el cerrojo de la puerta!. Un saludo, Eva

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  19. You've got me.......I also thought the tin can was a real one, hehehe ;)!
    Superb work, Pepper, thanks for sharing the tut!!
    Your shed of Jimmy's is incredible realistic, just like all the others said.
    Hugs, Ilona

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    1. Thank you IIona. That's very kind coming from such a talented Lady =0)

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  20. Wow Pepper! I thought you were showing pix of progress on a new hobby area. Even the plywood on the lower shelf sold that for me, until I read the description of the barrel bolt latch. This shed is spectacular in it's realism. I do ask though what you are using to glue your aluminum for the cans. I have not found suitable aluminun solder and find that superglue works really well with it. thanks for the can tutorial! There will be a few of those pop up here from time to time!

    Gary

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    1. Hy Gary, sorry for the late reply. I've been flitting between home and trips away.
      If I can't solder it, I always use Araldite epoxy resin glue or Roket max gel glue to stick metal. These are about the only things I found that work. I always scuff the metal with 30 grit sandpaper first so it gives the glue something to hold on to.

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  21. Merci Pepper!
    Superbe idée que d'utiliser des plats de cuisson! Ce doit être plus facile à plier que les canettes de soda.
    Amicalement, Dominique

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    1. Merci Dominique. Je coupe normalement mes doigts sur les boîtes de conserve, donc je devais trouver quelque chose de mieux. Ha-ha
      =0)

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  22. The detail in this shed is great and I love the can you have made. Very realistic. As you say I could imagine it slightly rusted with a label.

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    1. Thank you Sharee, I'm going to try rust it...see if I can make it look aged =0)

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  23. The bolt and can are absolute perfection. Such incredible 'eye' for stuff and then talent to do it. Well done you.
    Marilyn

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  24. how clever, I never would have thought to make a petrol can like that..I love it

    Hugs
    Marisa

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  25. The Shed is looking more realistic every time I see it! :-) I agree that it does need a better name.
    I can't believe you're going to York....... SOOOOOOOO jealous right now! :-)

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    1. Hey, you go to York all of the time =0P I hear they've names a street after you because you visit so often ha-ha
      X

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    2. Yes... well.. I just love York loads, it's so beautiful! If you have time left (probably not) go and visit Barley Hall, it's brilliant!

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  26. Outstanding in everyway and rather ingenious! :o)) Love the bench too, I want a smaller one for my greenhouse...I wish it could be as good as yours is! ;o)

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    1. Aw thank you Michelle. That's really kind of you =0)

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  27. This is wonderful! Looks so real!!! The lock between the floor and door is great!!
    Hannah

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  28. errrrmmmm...yeah, I'm in love with that can!!! :D Awesome work! I love The Shed, and I see no problem with it being named what it is. :]

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